Get Those Steps In: Walking the USF Campus!

Not only does regular physical activity play a vital role in optimal health, but it also improves mood and increases energy. Daily activity should be a top priority, but your exercise time is often the first to go when you are busy. Luckily, there are ways to stay active without sacrificing essential study or work time.

Personally, I think walking is the simplest way to incorporate physical activity without sacrificing time. Walking is the cheapest stress-free and low-impact exercise. Plus, it’s a great starting point for beginners because it has the lowest dropout rate of any workout.

Conveniently, today is National Walking Day. The American Heart Association recommends walking 10,000 steps daily, and walking one mile clocks around 2,000 steps. Fitness trackers, like Fitbit and Garmin, make tracking your physical activity easy.  If your smartphone stays with you all day, you can easily track steps with an app as well.

No matter how busy you are, keep a consistent workout schedule by incorporating walking into your daily routine. Meet daily fitness goals by walking to or around campus instead of driving or taking the bus. Your walk can be as easy as going to the Library or Recreation Center from your housing on-campus.


How many steps can you get during your daily routine on campus? Check out the distance of these common walking paths:

Juniper to Campus Recreation: 0.7 miles (around 1,400 steps)

Juniper to Library: 0.4 miles (800 steps)

MSC to Library 0.3 miles (600 steps)

MSC to Campus Recreation Center: 0.6 miles (1,200 steps)

Holly M to Library: 0.6 miles (1,200 steps)

Holly M to Campus Recreation Center: 0.6 miles (1,200 steps)

Greek Village to Campus Recreation Center: 0.6 miles (1,200 steps)

Greek Village to Library: 0.8 miles (1,600 steps)

42nd Street to MSC: 0.4 miles (800 steps)

42nd Street to the Campus Recreation Center: 1 mile (2,000 steps)

 

Also, check out USF Health’s useful maps for walking trails around the College of Medicine and College of Public Health.

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